Terry Treble’s New Look

Posted by on June 12, 2013 with 0 Comments

Terry Treble’s New Look

Since 2005, Terry Treble has been a familiar face to us all as a member of the MusicLearningCommunity family. Now, Terry Treble is orchestrating the movement of music education into the future.

Old Terry Treble 

Old Terry Treble

As our fearless leader, Terry Treble is personally overseeing the renovation of our e-learning system. Terry couldn’t be more excited for these amazing new developments and the insight he is gaining as a result! Opening up to the world’s vast store of musical knowledge, Terry has learned a great deal about the nature of music. As can be found in Terry Treble and H Note Write Music ©, Terry personally invented the method of capturing music on paper.  Continue Reading «Terry Treble’s New Look»

Filed Under: News

Terry Treble Books

Posted by on June 12, 2013 with 2 Comments

Terry Treble Books are Here!

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Terry TrebleMany are not aware of the importance of Terry Treble in music history.  So we are writing a few books to tell of Terry Treble’s contributions to music.  The first book is initially titled Terry Treble and H Note Make Music.  This book recounts the first efforts to write music—the creation of the staff and notes—and why there is no H note in modern music (the BACH motif).  Continue Reading «Terry Treble Books»

Filed Under: News

Similarities of Reading Music and Reading Words

Posted by on June 12, 2013 with 0 Comments

Reading Music and Reading Words Are Very Similar

Learning how to read music—specifically sight-reading—can be a challenge for a beginner musician. However, it does not have to be that difficult.  In fact, if you have the skills needed to read this article you already have some of the basic skills required to read sheet music. The trick is learning to take these everyday skills and employing them in a new capacity.

Discovering and Recognizing Patterns

At its core, spoken language is a musical phenomenon that uses controlled tone, pitch, and rhythm to convey meaning through sound. Each of these sounds is represented by a single, pair, or grouping of letters collectively referred to as an alphabet. When learning to read written language, our first attempts are characterized by the slow and rigorous process of sounding out each letter to produce words, sentences, paragraphs, stories, and eventually complex narratives depicting abstract ideas and emotions. Continue Reading «Similarities of Reading Music and…»

Filed Under: Education